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Navigating the artist's interview

In a new blog post on the web site for Voices in Contemporary Art, WUDPAC Fellow Alexandra Nichols contemplates the intricacies of working with living artists.

Color change puts world-renowned paintings at risk

An international team of scientists led by WUDPAC affiliated faculty and Winterthur Museum senior scientist Jennifer Mass has announced new findings on why a bright yellow pigment favored a century ago by master artists like Henri Matisse fades to drab beige.

International efforts to preserve sculpture parks

The web site for the International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works is currently featuring a blog post by former UD visiting scholar Sagita Sunara on collaborative efforts underway in Croatia to preserve outdoor sculptures from a historical artists' colony.

WUDPAC alumna's research on Egyptian pigments now available online

A video of Class of 2011 alumna Caroline Roberts discussing her documentation and analysis of green pigments on Late period through Roman period Egyptian artifacts in now available on the American Schools of Oriental Research web site.

Art conservation and the record of a lifetime

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  • ARTC eblast May 2015. Miranda Dunn setting up a Mylar covering prior to a humidity and vacuum pressure treatment to relax the painting
  • ARTC eblast May 2015. Miranda Dunn setting up a Mylar covering prior to a humidity and vacuum pressure treatment to relax the painting
  • ARTC eblast May 2015. Miranda Dunn removing the old deformed lining canvas
  • ARTC eblast May 2015. Miranda Dunn using a methyl cellulose poultice to remove glue residue left behind from the previous  lining
  • ARTC eblast May 2015. ollowing removal of the old lining, cleaning of the verso, relaxation, re-lining to a new canvas, varnishing, and filling of losses, Miranda inpaints losses
Gazing sorrowfully toward heaven, the image of the Virgin Mary is characteristic of the Italian Baroque style of oil painting popular in Europe from about 1690 to 1800. The Virgin’s sadness is traditionally explained by her presence at the crucifixion of Jesus; although this Virgin might also be sad if she had known the wear and tear she would experience before reaching WUDPAC Fellow Miranda Dunn.

Student Blog: Folger Shakespeare Library

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  • Student blog austin plann curley
  • Student blog austin plann curley
  • Student blog austin plann curley
  • Student blog austin plann curley
  • Student blog austin plann curley

In this blog post, WUDPAC Class of 2015 Fellow Austin Plann Curley shares his experience working with an international team of conservators at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, including the collaborative treatment of a 1535 text from the library's extensive collection of early modern books and manuscripts.

Art conservation and historical keepsakes

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  • ARTC eblast april 2015. Sydney Beall  surface cleaning around the tear in  The City Gate, St. Augustine
  • ARTC eblast April 2015. Detail of the patch during removal
  • ARTC eblast April 2015. Detail of the tear before mending
  • ARTC eblast April 2015. Detail of the completed thread-bridging tear mend, seen under magnification
  • ARTC eblast April 2015. Detail after treatment

Nineteenth-century travelers, valued pictures as mementoes of their trips. Those wealthy enough to travel would buy paintings from artists who catered to the vacation trade. One example, an impressionistic landscape painting called The City Gate, St. Augustine, recently became a treatment project for paintings major and WUDPAC Fellow Sydney Beall.

Student Blog: The Walters Art Museum and Winterthur Museum

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  • Emily Brown blog. Surface cleaning dirt and grime from delicate gold seaweed clasp.
  • Emily Brown blog. Mounted oyster shell before treatment.
  • Emily Brown blog. Earliest known photograph showing undamaged object with a smaller, similar mounted shell.
  • Emily Brown blog. Surface cleaning fragile oyster shell.
  • Emily Brown blog. Reducing tarnish (area on left) using an acidified thiourea gel.

In this blog post, WUDPAC Class of 2015 Fellow Emily Brown shares the range of experiences provided by her third-year internships in objects conservation, including her work on an oyster shell in a silver and gilt-silver metal mount made in the late 19th century by the Parisan goldsmith firm Froment-Meurice.

Art conservation and historical craftsmanship

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  • eblast: Bianca Garcia surface cleaning the Madonna with a buffered citrate solution
  • eblast: Bianca Garcia surface cleaning the Madonna with a buffered citrate solution
  • eblast: Detail of the hands before consolidation and removal of surface dirt and discolored  varnish
  • eblast: Detail of the hands after consolidation and removal of surface dirt and discolored  varnish

Damaged in an earthquake, riddled with worm holes and covered in dirt and grime, the 37-inch tall Madonna of the Immaculate Conception arrived at WUDPAC in very poor condition. But the polychrome Ecuadoran statue is much beloved by its current owner, who cradled it in a baby blanket when she delivered it, and it was welcomed as a treatment project by second-year fellow Bianca Garcia.

Student Blog: Center for Creative Photography

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  • Jae Gutierrez and Shannon A. Brogdon-Grantham treating Dr. Ewen Whitaker’s photomosaic of the surface of Mars
  • Shannon A. Brogdon-Grantham preparing a group of oversize photographs for travel to an exhibition site
  • Shannon A. Brogdon-Grantham mounting a photograph for a loan exhibition
  • Shannon A. Brogdon-Grantham creating a sealed exhibition package for the tintype of a water lily which will be on display at the Phoenix Art Museum

In this blog post, WUDPAC Class of 2015 Fellow  Shannon A. Brogdon-Grantham shares her thoughts on the connoisseurship, craft, and material science of photography as experienced through her internship at the University of Arizona's Center for Creative Photography, including her work caring for materials ranging from a small tintype of a water lily to large-scale prints from the astrophotography collection at the University's Space Imagery Center.

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