Home > News > Life-sized Lincoln Logs

More News

Student Blog: Fashion Institute of Technology

Student Blog: Fashion Institute of Technology

WUDPAC Class of 2023 Fellow Margaret O’Neil, a lifelong lover of historic fashion, shares the exciting objects and treatments she undertakes as an intern at the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology.
 
New UD spectrometer can detect surface materials, down to individual atoms

New UD spectrometer can detect surface materials, down to individual atoms

UD’s Surface Analysis Facility is home to a new instrument that offers critical techniques for chemistry, material science, environmental science, chemical engineering, conservation science and physics.
 
The spattered jama

The spattered jama

WUDPAC Class of 2022 alumna Annabelle Camp worked with colleagues at the Victoria & Albert Museum on a 19th-century court ensemble from Jodhpur, and wrote about it for the V&A weblog.
 
CONNECT
InstagramFacebook

Life-sized Lincoln Logs

Image Picker for Section 0
Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

A log cabin in a field, and a student sitting at a picnic table playing with a log cabin toy.

​​​​​

​White Grass Dude Ranch Cabin ​(left) and Morrigan building a Lincoln Log house (right). Images: Morrigan Kelley​ and Erin Gibbs​.

​This summer I attended a National Park Brick, Earth, Stone, Timber (BEST) workshop in Traditional Wood and Log Preservation and Repair that took place in Grand Teton National Park. This adventure was generously funded through the Vicki Cassman Undergraduate Award in Art Conservation. This traditional technique workshop appealed to me because of the potential to learn hands-on historic preservation approaches taught by practicing preservationists. I previously ​had worked in a historic preservation archive and was eager to see what preservation looked like out in the field and on a larger scale. I also went hoping to learn how the field of conservation and the field of historic preservation differed in terms of approach and ethical considerations. 

As part of the workshop, I had the opportunity to stay within the park for the week at White Grass Dude Ranch. The historic ranch, called a “dude" ranch because wealthy East coasters would come to play cowboy in the Wyoming mountains, previously underwent a full-scale preservation project to modernize and make the 1913 log structures viable accommodations for the 21st-century visitor. Before I arrived all I knew about my stay at the ranch was that I would be given two things: linens and bear spray. From the start, I knew this workshop would be unlike anything I had yet to experience.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Students sitting on a log, listening to a teacher, and a crosssection diagram of a log.

​Left: Workshop participants listening to Wood Scientist Ron Anthony.​ Image: Erin Gibbs. Right: Figure highlighting different characteristics of a sawn log. Image: Morrigan Kelley​.

​After I collected my linens and bear spray, I surveyed my cabin for the week. Deemed the “nice" cabin by the caretakers, I had the two bed one bath building all to myself, with rocking chairs on the porch overlooking a meadow. Throughout the week, my cabin would be used as an example of previous preservation and be used for a condition assessment of the logs that made up the structure. 

Day one and day two of the workshop were filled with learning from a fast-talking expert wood scientist, Ron Anthony. We learned to identify different aspects of wood and all the ins and the outs of how wood and logs react to different conditions. Rather than only having discussions, we worked together to do hands on activities demonstrating each aspect; we put wood chunks in water and watched it wick the water up along the grain (or through the “straws" as the scientist demonstrated with actual straws in a bundle); we put together a log sawn in 14 pieces as a “puzzle" to learn about sawing patterns; we got to play with Lincoln logs to consider if the wooden logs in the building we built would survive. For each activity, I worked alongside historic preservationists Mike Cardis from the Historic Preservation Training Center in Maryland and Robert Story from Yosemite National Park, merging our different perspectives based not only on experience level but also on geographic location. ​

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

A teacher demonstrates using a tool to peel a log, and a student uses the tool to peel a log.
Left: Workshop participants watching a demonstration on wood peeling by Historic Preservationist Tim Green. Image: Erin Gibbs​. Right: Morrigan peeling a log using a draw knife. Image: Ainsley Harrower​.
Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Detail of a log before and after peeling.

​Before (left) and after (right) log peeling with a draw knife. Images: Morrigan Kelley.

​Supplementing our two days with the wood scientist, we were instructed by preservationist Erin Gibbs to discuss how to document preservation, and the impacts—both positive and negative—that preservation may have, and what signifies significance. Much like in conservation, we discussed who the stakeholders were and used theoretical scenarios to decide what the appropriate response would be. Additionally, we did condition assessments of log structures throughout the park to put our new knowledge to the test.

The next three days of the workshop were entirely hands-on. Learning from White Grass Preservationist Tim Green, we talked safety—including goggles, gloves, personal awareness, and tool specific considerations—and watched demonstrations of the different techniques. Our project for the week was to begin building the walls of a future storage building to learn how to use the different tools and try traditional, all by hand, techniques that were used when many historic log structures were initially built. I had never used any of these tools before, so I had a lot to learn.​

To start, we began with log peeling using a draw knife. This method was easiest when sitting on the log in a sawhorse for stabilization and pulling the draw knife with the beveled edge down towards you. Logs are peeled to remove the bark. Leaving bark on the log allows more places for small critters to live and moisture to hangout (moisture is the enemy of wood). The results were satisfying.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

A student hammers a wooden piece into a log, and a student and teacher lining up an instrument on a cabin log.

​Left: Morrigan using a log dog to stabilize the log​. Right: Morrigan and Mike Cardis, preservationist, calibrating a protractor for scribing. Images: Ainsley Harrower.​

​Step two was to scribe where the log would join with the next log beneath it. To start, we moved the log from the sawhorse and sat it atop the log we would be connecting. Then, we used a log dog, which looked like a very large and sharp staple, to hold the two logs in position. Then we calibrated a protractor and drew a semicircle where material from the top log should be removed, creating a saddle notch, so that it sits snuggly on top of the bottom log perpendicularly and forms the corner of the building.​​

After scribing we got to work on removing material to make a saddle notch. We used axes to initially remove material in bulk before we refined the edges and tuned the notch to fit perfectly with a chisel. It took many tried to get the perfect fit, but we got there! After finishing we stamped our names int the log using a metal stamp and hammer. Maybe one day I will go back to White Grass Dude Ranch and find my name on a building. During the workshop, four new storage buildings were started in total by all the groups.

It was such a pleasure getting to learn alongside so many passionate people. When not learning, I had the opportunity to go for hikes to waterfalls, lake overlooks, and even stand where Ansel Adams took his iconic 1942 photograph The Tetons and The Snake River. Ultimately, I walked away from this experience not only having learned many things about wood and logs and their preservation, but I also left with new connections. ​

— Morrigan Kelley (Conservation Assistant, Winterthur/Hagley/UD, UD Class of 2022)​​

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

A student uses a chisel to carve a notch in a log while two teachers watch.

​Morrigan refining the saddle notch with a chisel while preservationists Robert Story (bottom) and Joel Bredeson (top) look on. Image: Theresa Moriarty​.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Two logs placed together using the notches, and a detail of the student's name stamped on a log.

​A finished saddle notch​ (left) and Morrigan’s stamp (right) on the log she notched​. Images: Morrigan Kelley​.

​​

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Image Rendition

Change the way the image is cropped for this page layout.

Media Size

Cycle through size options for this image or video.

Original
50%
66%
100%
Fixed Portrait 1
Fixed Portrait 2
Cancel
Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Insert Image

Open the image pane in this body section. Click in the image pane to select an image from the image library.

Insert Video

Open the video pane in this body section. Click in the video pane to embed a video. Click ? for step-by-step instructions.

Remove Image

Remove the image from the media panel. This does not delete the image from the library.

Remove Video

Remove the video from the media panel.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Move Down

Move this whole section down, swapping places with the section below it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

Move Up

Move this whole section up, swapping places with the section above it.

Code Cleaner

Check for and fix problems in the body text. Text pasted in from other sources may contain malformed HTML which the code cleaner will remove.

Accordion is OFF

Accordion feature turned off, click to turn on.

Accordion is ON

Accordion featurd turned on, click to turn off.

Media Right/Left-Align

Align the media panel to the right/left in this section.

News Story Supporting Images and Text
Used in the Home Page News Listing and for the News Rollup Page
This summer, UD Class of 2022 alumna Morrigan Kelley attended a National Park Brick, Earth, Stone, Timber workshop where she learned traditional wood and log preservation and repair techniques.
9/18/2022
No
No
Page Settings and MetaData:
(Not Shown on the Page)
Page Settings
Life-sized Lincoln Logs
No
MetaData for Search Engine Optimization
Life-sized Lincoln Logs