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MITRA Forum Question Details

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 ForumQuestion

  • New peptide free linseed oilApproveRejectUn-ApproveSubscribeUn-Unsubscribe
    Question asked 2018-03-06 23:26:04 ... Most recent comment 2018-03-08 20:37:26
    Oil Paint
    Question

    ​I'd like to hear the opinions of the experts on this linseed oil developed by the University of Saskatchewan.  It sounds great, but I'm not sure if the peptides are necessary for long term for stability of paint films. The news release is here:

     https://news.usask.ca/media-release-pages/2017/u-of-s-basic-research-leads-to-non-yellowing-flax-based-oil-for-artists-paints.php

Answers and Comments
  • EditDeleteModerator Answer

    ​This is the first that I have heard about this but my initial take would be to reiterate this quote from the article, "Reaney notes that further research will be needed to determine the long-term properties of the new flax-based paint medium." Perhaps our industry contacts are more savvy about the subject.

    Brian Baade
    2018-03-06 23:54:05
  • ApproveRejectUn-ApproveUser Comment

    ​Sounds very interesting, I hope further testing proves it works!

    2018-03-07 02:35:12
  • ApproveRejectUn-ApproveUser Comment

    ​I ordered some of this oil last year to try it out. I applied thin swatches to my ongoing medium test sheets (Arches Huile oil painting paper; one is stored in the light, on a wall of my studio, the other is stored in the dark. Observations: 

    1. It seems to be less prone to dark-induced yellowing. The swatch on my dark sheet is a relatively light yellow, and looks more like poppy oil or stand oil than regular linseed. 

    2. In the light, however, it is MORE prone to yellowing than regular linseed oil. The swatch on my light sheet is noticeably yellower then the swatch of cold-pressed linseed oil next to it.

    3. Contrary to their advertising, this is a slow-drying oil. The swatch on the light sheet took twice as long as cold-pressed linseed oil to become touch-dry, and the swatch on my dark sheet, weirdly, remained completely wet for months

    Based on my observations, I decided not to use this oil. YMMV, of course.


    -Ben





    2018-03-07 10:06:55
  • ApproveRejectUn-ApproveUser Comment

    The difference in drying time what what they advertise is interesting. It suggests to me that it's behaving more like a drying oil like safflower of sunflower with a paler colour, but slower drying.

    The more yellowing factor in light is odd though..

    2018-03-07 14:30:48
  • ApproveRejectUn-ApproveUser Comment

    ​Thanks for the details of your testing Ben. Certainly not what I would have expected given their claim of a faster drying time. 

    2018-03-08 20:37:26
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